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Birds & Birding Regional Birder

This is regional birding information for:

Midwest
April 2014

The Midwest is a slice of many North American ecosystems, starting in the northern Great Lakes where the great coniferous forest represents a Canadian life zone. South of the forests, one finds a mixture of abandoned, grown up fields and small woodlots amidst active farms where cattle graze and crops are sown. The farther south one travels, the more the land turns to prairie grasslands. This vast contrast in habitat from deep northern coniferous forests, to prairie grasslands in the south, produces an equally diverse offering of birdlife.

Backyard Birds

Because of the diverse habitat in the Midwest, the most common backyard birds are among the most common backyard birds throughout North America: black-capped chickadee, white-breasted nuthatch, house finch, house wren, northern cardinal, rose-breasted grosbeak, Baltimore oriole, ruby-throated hummingbird, American robin, eastern bluebird, barn swallow, purple martin, blue jay, downy woodpecker, northern flicker, mourning dove, ring-necked pheasant, killdeer, dark-eyed junco, song sparrow, yellow warbler, cedar waxwing, brown-headed cowbird, red-winged blackbird, gray catbird, mallard duck and Canada goose.

Regional Birds

In the northern forests, ruffed grouse, dark-eyed juncos, evening grosbeaks, red and white-winged crossbills, pine siskin, spruce grouse and red-breasted nuthatch breed. South of the great forests, in the more open, abandoned fields, croplands and farms, where woodlots, lakes and streams are plentiful, birders hear mourning doves coo, and eastern towhee sing. Also common are black-capped chickadee, white-breasted nuthatch, Baltimore oriole, common grackle, red-eyed vireo, and blue-winged and golden-winged warblers.

In the southernmost regions of the Midwest, the birdlife is different again. Bobwhite whistle from fence posts, red-winged blackbird, American goldfinch, marsh wren, great blue heron and Canada geese are seen. The Great Lakes attract deep water and diving ducks, as well as gulls and terns.

What's happening in your backyard this month
  • American robins are back; males fighting over territories and singing.
  • Eastern bluebirds, mourning doves and killdeer are nesting.
  • Black-capped chickadees, tree swallows and purple martins are inspecting birdhouses.
  • Purple finches, fox sparrows, white-throated sparrows and first warblers passing through, headed north.
What to do in your backyard this month
  • Restore water areas and birdbaths in preparation for waves of thirsty migrants.
  • Birdhouses, including purple martin houses, should be up and ready for occupants.
  • Prepare sugar water feeders for arrival of orioles and hummingbirds.
  • Plant ground cover, shrubs and small trees as natural bird cover.
 

 

 

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